Using your drug plan for the first time

What do I bring to the pharmacy?

  • Your red, white, and blue Medicare card [JPG]
  • A photo ID (like a state driver’s license or passport)
  • Your plan membership card

Automatic refill mail-order service for prescription drugs

Some people with Medicare get their drugs through an “automatic refill” service that automatically delivers prescription drugs before they run out. To make sure you still need a prescription before they send you a refill, drug plans may offer a voluntary auto-ship program. Contact your plan for more information.

 

Note

Be sure to give your pharmacy the best way to reach you, so you don't miss the refill confirmation call or other communication.

Learn how to sign up online for automatic refills with some pharmacies or get your prescription history.

If you have both Medicare and 

Medicaid [Glossary]

 or qualify for 

Extra Help

, also bring proof of your enrollment in Medicaid or proof that you qualify for Extra Help

Using network pharmacies

Medicare drug plans have contracts with "network pharmacies." These pharmacies have agreed to provide members of certain Medicare plans with services and supplies at a discounted price. In some Medicare plans, your prescriptions are only covered if you get them filled at network pharmacies.

Along with retail pharmacies, your plan’s network might include preferred pharmacies, a mail-order program, or an option for retail pharmacies to supply a 2- or 3-month supply.

  • Preferred pharmacies. If your plan has preferred pharmacies, you may save money on your out-of-pocket prescription drug costs (like a Copayment or Coinsurance ) at a preferred pharmacy because it has agreed with your plan to charge less.
  • Mail-order programs. Some plans may offer a mail-order program that allows you to get up to a 3-month supply of your covered prescription drugs sent directly to your home. This may be a cost-effective and convenient way to fill prescriptions you take regularly.
  • 2- or 3-month retail pharmacy programs. Some retail pharmacies may also offer a 2- or 3-month supply of covered prescription drugs.