Getting Medicare if you have a disability

 

I'm under 65 and have a disability.

Do I need to sign up?

You automatically get Part A and Part B after you get one of these:

  • Disability benefits from Social Security for 24 months
  • Certain disability benefits from the RRB for 24 months

Should I get Part B?

Most people should enroll in Part A when they're first eligible, but certain people may choose to delay Part B. Find out more about whether you should take Part B.

How do I sign up?

You don’t need to sign up if you automatically get Part A and Part B. You'll get your red, white, and blue Medicare card in the mail 3 months before your 25th month of disability.

When do I sign up?

You don’t need to sign up since you automatically get Part A and Part B.

Can I get a health or drug plan?

When you decide how to get your Medicare coverage, you might choose:

There are specific times when you can sign up for these plans, or make changes to coverage you already have.

I have ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also called Lou Gehrig's disease).

Do I need to sign up?

You automatically get Part A and Part B the month your disability benefits begin. 

Should I get Part B?

Most people should enroll in Part A when they're first eligible, but certain people may choose to delay Part B. Find out more about whether you should take Part B.

How do I sign up?

You don't need to sign up if you automatically get Part A and Part B. You'll get your red, white, and blue Medicare card in the mail the month your disability benefits begin.

When do I sign up?

You don’t need to sign up since you automatically get Part A and Part B.

Can I get a health or drug plan?

When you decide how to get your Medicare coverage, you might choose:

There are specific times when you can sign up for these plans, or make changes to coverage you already have.

I’m under 65 and have a disability. I’d like to go back to work. Can I keep my Medicare coverage? 

Yes. You can keep your Medicare coverage for as long as you’re medically disabled. If you return to work, you won't have to pay your Part A premium for the first 8 ½ years. After that, you’ll have to pay the Part A premium.  

If you can't afford the Part A premium, you may be able to get help from your state. You may be eligible for the 

Medicare Savings Program

 called the 

Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) Program [Glossary]

.